Shaare Zedek Top

A Lulav's Sense Of Identity

Speaker:
Ask author
Date:
Apr 10, 2019
Downloads:
0
Views:
1
Comments:
0
 

 


לע"נ ר' שמעון ב"ר חיים אליעזר 




לזכות ידיד נפשי ואהובי רבי אברהם שרגא בן מלכה אסתר וכל משפחתו לברכה והצלחה בכל מעשי ידיהם!!



The Raavad [or as he is called in the yeshivos "Ryvid"] asks why a dried out lulav is listed among a stolen or worshipped lulav which are pasul all seven days while a dried out lulav should only be pasul on the first day. [The Raavad holds that פסולי הדר apply to the first day only as it says in the sefer תמים דעים סי' רכ"ז and a dried out lulav is pasul because it lacks הדר as the gemara says]: 



קשיא לי כיון שביום הראשון פסול היבש אבל בשאר יומי לא, מ"ט תני ליה בין גזול לאשרה ועיר הנדחת שהן פסולין כל שבעה הו"ל למיתנייה בהדי קטומין ונפרצו עליו ונקובים שאינן פסולין אלא ביום הראשון?!


He answers that a dried out lulav is in fact pasul all seven days because it is like "dead" and thus lacks a shiur based on the law of כתותי מיכתת שיעורא - the shiur is "crumbled" and thus rendered meaningless and non-existent:  



וכמה נאה בעיני הטעם שפי' הירושלמי פ"ג ה"א על היבש שהוא פסול על שם לא המתים יהללו וגו' והטעם הזה נופל כל שבעת הימים וכו' ובודאי כיון שהוא כמת כמי שאינו דומה וכשל אשרה ועיר הנידחת הוא דמיכתת שיעוריה הלכך פסול הוא כל שבעת ימים ... ואע"פ שפירשו בגמרא שלנו הטעם שהוא הדר לרוחא דמילתא הוא דאיתמר דבעו למסמך טעמא על דבר תורה כדפרישנא לעיל ואם מת הוא בודאי אינו הדר שהמת כבר הלך כל זיוו כמת עכ"ל.


The Ramban in his hasagos on the Raavad will have none of that. He asks on the Raavad that a dried out lulav doesn't crumble in one's hand so why should we say that it ceases to halachically exist? He also says that being "dead" doesn't negate one's shiur, as evidenced by the fact that a dead person is מטמא even though [or actually BECAUSE] he is dead. According to the Raavad we should say that a מת lacks the requisite shiur and כתותי מיכתת שיעוריה?!  



וכי לולב היבש מתפרך הוא בידים והלא עומד כמה שנים וחזק כרצועות ועושין ממנו חבלים וכל דברי חזק וכו' ואמאי נימא כתותי מכתת שיעוריה דיבשין וכמאן דליתנייהו דמי והו"ל נפרצו עליו ופסול, ועוד היכן מצא הרב זה הענין שנאמר על דבר המת שהוא כמי שאין בו שיעור והלא לענין טומאה כולן מטמאין בשיעוריהן וכשהוא עומד לשריפה אינן מטמאין דכל העומד לישרף כשרוף דמי עכ"ל. 



The Ritva was also not pleased. He asks that if "dead" is considered as if there is no shiur then how can we use a מת as a wall for the succah. 



THE RAAVAD NEEDS A LAWYER AS HE IS NO LONGER HERE TO DEFEND HIMSELF!!!



Numerous acharonim jumped to the defense of the Raavad. BARUCH HASHEM!!! I will not list all the sources. Whomever wants will be able to find... [See for example משמיע שלום סי' פ', חדוות מרדכי סי' ה', סוגיות משנת יוסף ח"ב סי' כ"ח ועוד ועוד] 



One explanation is given in the sefer סוכת דוד [at the end of סימן כ"ו] of the Supreme Gaon HaRav Dovid Yitzchak Mann ztz"l [and others offered similar explanations, such as the חלק שמואל סי' ל"ב ובקובץ ירחי כלה ח"ב סי' ק"כ]: The Ramban and Ritva understood that the Raavad was saying that a dried out lulav lacks a מציאות. That is clearly not the case. But what he meant was that when it is dried out it loses it's מהות and essence as a lulav. It loses its "identity" as a lulav, if you will [if you won't, then email me and we will work it out]. When it comes to a wall of a succah all one needs is a מציאות of a wall and it is kosher. But when it comes to a lulav, in order for it to have the status and identity of a lulav - שם לולב - it must not be dried out [this lulav should see a psychologist to help him deal with his loss of identity]. When it dries out it is no longer הדר [as the gemara says clearly] and is thus no longer a lulav. [Of course a corpse has the essence of a corpse and is thus מטמא, so that is also not a question on the Raavad]. 



GEVALLLLDIKKK!!!

Gemara:
Succah 

More from this:
Comments
0 comment
Leave a Comment
Title:
Comment:
Anonymous: 

Learning on the Marcos and Adina Katz YUTorah site is sponsored today for a refuah shleimah for טובה מאטל בת חנה אטל and by Nicole and Michael Strongin in memory of their grandparents